Homegrown Harvest Live! Q&A Thursday

Every Thursday live on Instagram @homegrown_harvest answers questions from followers about gardening and sustainable living. If you have any questions you would like answered, we would love to help out. Send your questions to info@homegrownharvest.com.

Can the newish full spectrum LED home light bulbs do double duty as grow lights?

  • The short answer is yes – the words full spectrum give you a clue that it includes the full light spectrum
  • However, plants only need 2/3 of the spectrum to grow so therefore you would be wasting 1/3 of the energy the light is putting out.
  • Horticultural LED bulbs are inexpensive and deliver the exact type of light plants and flowers need to thrive indoors.

I recently learned that daylilies are edible and already knew pansies and roses were too. Can you recommend some other edible ornamentals?First, as far as edible flowers goes, its important to stress that you need to know EXACTLY what you are eating and check with your doctor first and talk to a plant specialist. There are some plants which may be dangerous to you if you have certain conditions.

There are plenty of edible flowers which can be added to our gardens and plates. But it’s important to know about the plants we would like to consume and what they can do for or to us. It’s highly recommended that you always use flowers sparingly as digestive complications can occur with large consumption rate.

Cooking with flowers has been around since the early Romans and is a part of Chinese, Middle Eastern & Indian cultures. Not every flower or plant is edible and sometimes the flower may be edible but the foliage is not; or it may be edible only after cooking. Also never harvest flowers or plants that have pesticides or other chemicals on it if you plan to eat and NEVER harvest plants/flowers by the roadside.

  • Some flowers are edible but it doesn’t necessarily mean they should be eaten. For instance waxed begonias are edible but taste bitter and can taste swampy. Other begonias are edible as well but if you have gout, kidney stones or rheumatism – you should stay away from these.
  • Calendula has a start taste similar to saffron and is actually called Poor Man’s saffron. Sprinkle on soups, pasta, or rice dishes, herbed butters and salads
  • Carnations – petals are sweet – don’t eat the bitter white base of the flower; carnation petals are the secret ingredient in the French liqueur, Chartreuse since the 17th century  
  • Chrysanthemums – flavors range from faint peppery to mild cauliflower; should be blanched; leaves are used to flavor vinegar – always remove the bitter flower base.
  • Dandelions – good raw or steamed, made into wine, sweet when picked young, buds tastier than the flowers.
  • Fuchsia blooms have a slimly acidic flavor, berries are also edible
  • Hibiscus – cranberry-like, dried to make tea.
  • Johnny-jumps ups have a mild wintergreen flavor, good in sales, add in drinks, soups, dessert and salads
  • Nasturtiums are a sweet, yet spicy flavor similar to watercress. Stuff the flowers and add the leaves in a salad to add a peppery tang.
  • Violets have a sweet perfumed flavor, related to pansies, violas and johnny-jump ups; use the tender leaves and flowers in salads, cold drinks and desserts; the heart shaped leaves when cooked taste like spinach.